Piano Tuning, Piano Refinishing, Piano Moving, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Westchester, Long Island, Manhattan, NY NJ CT.

call (800)33-TUNER and email us:  info@amadeuspianos.com

We would like to inform the general public regarding regular guidelines for maintaining and owning a piano. Below are recommendations based on most piano manufacturer warranties and suggestions for minimal proper care of a piano.

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In order to keep proper string tension, every piano must be tuned at least twice per year, if moderately used.  For heavy of professional use, more frequent piano tuning service is required with experienced piano tuners.  In concert halls and recording studios, the piano is typically tuned before each performance.

Process:    Both grand and upright pianos are tuned according to the equal temperament, originally invented by baroque musician and composer J.S. Bach, who also wrote the well-tempered clavier for the piano.  The purpose of equal temperament is so that the same song can be played in different keys and still sound like the same piece of music, subdividing the keyboard into even half-steps and evening out the relationship between the piano's keys.  This is especially convenient for playing with and adjusting to other instruments and vocalists.  The string tension of the "A" below middle "C" on the piano is matched to a tuning fork with a frequency of 440HZ, which is the standard for most modern music today.  Following that, the first octave is tuned by establishing the correct pitches of the intervals within the middle octave.  This completes the temperament, and the matching process begins to reproduce the results of the first octave throughout the rest of the piano's registers. To see a video clip of a piano tuner tuning a piano, click to watch Yury Feygin, expert piano tuner raise the pitch and set equal temperament on a Steinway & Sons Grand Piano in these video clips: clip1, clip2

Schedule:    The tuning schedule of a piano should coincide with the heating cycle of the room in which the piano is located.  After the beginning of a heating cycle, in the fall, allow the piano to acclimate to the new humidity level for two to three weeks and then have it tuned.  Likewise, after the end of the heating cycle in the spring, wait two to three weeks after the heat has been turned off and then have your piano tuned.  If you have a humidity control system installed, don't forget to check and change your filter pads at the same time you have your piano tuned.

Tuning vs. Pitch Raising vs. Voicing:    Although piano tuning is a separate process from voicing or any mechanical adjustments, many clients assume that one includes or even stands for the other.  Raising the pitch of a piano is a separate process as well, even though it is related to the tuning of a piano.  Piano tuning is the pulling of strings to their appropriate pitch, to achieve equal temperament and a good relative tuning.  Equal temperament, in short, allows you to play the same song in a different key with an equally proportional tuning, allowing the song to sound just as good.  Pitch raising is the process of raising the pitch of the whole piano.  Pitch raising can be necessary for some types of contemporary music.  For some early music, lowering the pitch is also common.  The standard concert pitch today is A=440Hz.  In the times of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the standard concert pitch was A=432Hz.  Today, some contemporary composers write for pitch A=445Hz and some even higher.  Depending on how far the pitch needs to be moved, this process may require tuning the piano several times until it's able to hold the pitch, as the strings stretch out to their new tension.  Rising the pitch of a piano is a potentially dangerous undertaking, which should be performed by an expert tuner only.  It's often recommended that a piano be tuned in several steps, spaced a few weeks or even months apart.  However, it can be done in one day with a set of three or four consecutive piano tunings, if the piano can handle the change in pressure.  The pressure from the strings on the bridges and soundboards is always set at thousands of pounds of tension.  When a piano is out of tune, the change in pressure is so tremendous that it may cause cracks in the hardwoods of the piano, such as the bridges, soundboard, and pinblock.  The technician should inspect the piano and determine whether or not the wood can handle such a stress in one sitting.  Voicing is sometimes misunderstood by amateurs and professionals alike.  The purpose of voicing a piano is to adjust the hardness of the hammers to help even out the tone of the piano, dampening some imperfections in the quality of the hammers and compensating for some acoustical shortcomings of the instrument.  In order to do this job perfectly, two highly-skilled technicians are needed on the job:  one person to listen from different angles of the room and another to adjust the hammers according to the directions from the listening technician.  This project costs approximately twice that of a piano tuning, but when performed correctly, will make a dramatic difference in the sound of the piano.

Click to watch Yury Feygin, expert piano tuner raise the pitch and set equal temperament on a Steinway & Sons Grand Piano in these video clips: clip 1, clip 2

Local Piano Moving (same-day)

North East / New England area

Entire continental United States


Click on a Service below for more information:

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Tuning, Pitch Raising, & Voicing - we service & repair all types of acoustic pianos - grand, baby grand, upright, or spinet... We have two central offices: Factory located at 2184 Pond Rd., Ronkonkoma, NY (800)338-8637 and offices in Stamford, CT - for piano tuning and service in CT, please call (203)569-5078

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Repairs & Regulation (Action) - there are over 9,000 parts that compose the average piano - including key pieces like the keyboard, strings, soundboard, bridge, damper, pedal, hammer, etc.  Action Regulation is essential for optimum performance...

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Rebuilding & Restoration - as a fine wine ages with time, so does the wood of a piano.  Older, hand-made pianos are often tonally superior to even the finest new pianos available...and well worth preserving.

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Refinishing & Polishing - add to the appeal of your piano, while enhancing its natural beauty...

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Appraisals & Estimates  - if you would like to purchase a piano or sell your piano, then only way to know the exact value of your instrument is to have a piano technician perform a full inspection and written appraisal on the instrument...

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Buying & Selling - broken hinge?  busted wheel or caster?  torn cushion or broken bench?  We can special order supplies to fulfill your parts & accessories needs.

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Rentals - Short/Long Term - looking to rent a piano for a day, week, month, or even year?  Call us for a free quote - and don't forget to ask about our Rent w/Option to Buy package.

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Moving - Local/Nationwide - we take great care in relocating pianos, whether the distance is down a floor, down the hall or several states away.  We are properly scheduled and dedicate ourselves fully to every job, moving one piano at a time.

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Storage  - if you're having home repairs performed or you're relocating, don't take the risk of piano damage.  Let us store your upright or grand piano in our brand new climate-controlled storage and warehouse facility.

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Lessons  - now, the same professional tri-state coverage is available for music lessons as it is for quality piano service, and with the same quick availability and prompt scheduling.

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Climate & Humidity Control Systems - piano actions are composed mainly of wood & felt, materials highly susceptible to environmental changes.

Tuning, Pitch Raising, & Voicing

Piano TuningPiano TuningPiano Tuning

click to watch Yury Feygin, expert piano tuner raise the pitch and set equal temperament on a Steinway & Sons Grand Piano in these video clips: clip 1, clip 2

Grand Piano Soundboard

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In order to keep proper string tension, every piano must be tuned at least twice per year, if moderately used.  For heavy or professional use more frequent service is required.  In concert halls and recording studios, the piano is typically tuned before each performance.  The tuning schedule should coincide with the heating cycle of the room in which the piano is located.  After the beginning of a heating cycle, in the fall, allow the piano to acclimate to the new humidity level for two to three weeks and then have it tuned.  Likewise, after the end of a heating cycle, in the spring, wait two to three weeks after the heat has been turned off and then have it tuned.

 

Repairs & Regulation (Action)

Piano Action

Copyright © 2002 Lloyd Meyer & Company

The diagram above illustrates the working components of One Key from the action of a standard grand piano.

 

Piano Action

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The working mechanism of the modern acoustic piano is made from the same materials as those used in the manufacturing of the first pianos - over 300 years ago.  The main components of the action are wood and felt.  Even the most famed and modern piano manufacturing facilities fully assemble the mechanism by hand.  Because of its construction, the piano action is liable to be affected not only by mechanical wear and tear, but also by the ever-changing temperature and humidity levels surrounding the piano.  In order to prolong the life of the action and its optimal performance, most manufacturers recommend that the action be regulated at least once every two years.  Depending on the climate and use, the schedule may be more frequent.  This job should only be performed by highly-trained, qualified technicians because the quality and the life of the action depends on the precision of the regulation.

 

 
(below, from left to right)  The first picture below illustrates the difference between hammers and dampers that have been re-shaped, and those that are worn.  The second picture below is taken from the reverse side of an upright piano action - here you can clearly see the misalignment of the whippens - causing such problems as sticking keys, added noise, etc.  The third picture is an example of how an amateur piano technician repaired a broken hammer with a hollow metal shaft - proper technique would require complete replacement of the hammer shank.  The fourth picture is an example of another quick-fix by an amateur - using straws to hold a broken hammer in place.  Both techniques actually weaken the hammer and can cause undue wear to the action.  Unlike our competition, our technicians are skilled craftsmen who would never sacrifice quality for a fast buck - we fix it right the first time!
Piano Action
Piano Action
Piano Action
Piano Action
Consumers Beware...

In a field such as piano repair and restoration, there are few places for formal education and training. Many people learn the trade from their parents, hence the establishment of firms ending in " & Sons," which ran rampant in the piano industry. There used to be a surge in the education of piano tuners and technicians in the wake of war, where people who lost their sight could find themselves useful in society again, but now there are only a handful of schools offering such education. A piano technician must first be a musician. In order to be able to repair a piano to the specifications of the musician, especially for tone adjustment, tuning, and voicing, you must be able to play the piano very well. The Piano Technician must know what the instrument should feel like when it's properly adjusted, and in order to be able to communicate with and understand the customer who is a musician. Many technicians who call themselves professionals are simply amateurs who only have partial and limited knowledge. Here's an example of a recent letter to us from an amateur technician who's been in the field for what he claims is over 30 years:

"As a thirty year piano technician I feel obligated to comment on something you've written concerning hammershank repair for an upright piano.  
You said it's an amateur's "quick fix" repair and "wouldn't hold up in the long run."  Well, in my experience that's totally wrong.  If the straw is used with a super glue (or even an aliphatic resin like tight bond )and the straw is of the proper diameter to ensure a tight connection of both shank segments it DOES hold up over time as I myself have discovered.  In fact, this splicing technique may be superior to using the brass sleeves that have been sold by supply houses.  The only time it would fail is if the shank break isn't clean and too close to the hammer.  In that instance, replacing the shank with a new one would be the only long term secure option."

- Mark Mandell,
  msmandl@earthlink.net

If this technician was a pro, he would understand that in order to function properly, a hammer shank doesn't just have to be there, but it has to be flexible. It's true that if you dress it with a straw and some "super glue," it will exist for some time, but by no standards will it be able to perform its proper duty, hardening and dulling the sound, not to mention the ugly look of a drinking straw in your piano! Lets call it what it is, a quick fix, which is an amateur's way out of a situation. We say: either do it right, or don't do it at all! It takes the same amount of time for a professional technician to replace the hammer shank that it takes to put a drinking straw on it. Lets remember that a piano is more than some antique machine. It has to work, yes. But it also has to maintain its value and aesthetic look and sound.

  No Quick Fix Lubricants!

If your piano technician is about to spray a lubricant into your piano, aside from pedal mechanisms and such, please stop them and ask what they're about to do. There is just about no reason for a piano technician to spray a lubricant into your piano's action. The mechanism is lubricated by graphite, a dry lubricant applied when the piano action is taken apart. Most types of other grease, such as WD40 will deteriorate action felt and wood and cause further sticking of keys, odor, etc. The worst effect of these sprays is that the damage on felt and wood is irreversible. Replacement of parts today is very expensive, especially on antique pianos. If your piano technician's reply includes: it will stop the keys from sticking, throw them out of your home immediately, and tell them that we said to do so! Sticking keys are a sign of a problem such as misalignment. The piano mechanism is not designed to be aided with such lubrication. If all parts are assembled and aligned correctly, the keys will not stick. The other potential cause of sticking keys is the change in humidity, which is not fixed with lubrication either.


Rebuilding & Restoration

Knabe Baby Grand Piano SoundboardKnabe Baby Grand Piano Soundboard

 

 

 

Grand Piano Soundboard

 

 

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Over time, the condition of a piano may get beyond that which is repairable through regular maintenance.  This depends on factors such as the age, use, and location of the instrument.  The piano may lose its sound quality, its ability to hold its tuning, its look, and ultimately its value.  There are many ways to restore or rebuild your piano.  The main objective in the restoration or rebuilding of a piano is to bring back the quality of the sound, precision and sensitivity of the action, and the look and value of the instrument.  Pianos are built to be individual in nature, and therefore age differently at their own pace depending on the various factors mentioned above.  While some people may think that there is no point to fix an old piano when there are many new, nice looking, accessibly priced pianos on the market - most professional musicians believe this to be a fallacy.  The prime benefit of old instruments are the quality of the wood with which they were built.  This wood was properly aged from 30 to 50 years, sometimes more, depending on the manufacturer.  Moreover, old pianos were built almost entirely by hand, emphasizing the individuality of each instrument.  Hence, the sound quality of a relatively inexpensive older piano can compete with the sound of the most expensive modern piano.  Our company is fully equipped and able to restore or rebuild your piano to the highest industry standards.

 


Refinishing & Polishing

 

Grand Piano

 

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When considering the refinishing of your pianos, you should know about the various products and methods available to you, as well as what is appropriate for your particular piano.  Traditionally, the object of refinishing a piano is to restore the original look of the instrument.  However, some customers change the color of the piano to make it match the furniture in their homes.  While this is possible, professionals usually don't recommend changing solid colors (black, white, etc.) to wood finishes (mahogany, walnut, oak) since removing a solid base color may reveal some damages, imperfections, or mismatched patterns in the original wood.  There are many types of lacquers and finishes available on the market, such as:  regular lacquer, polyurethane, water-based finishes, and polyester.  For antique, highly-detailed, carved, or ornamented pianos, many prefer a French polish.  This is a hand-refinishing technique performed by applying and buffing out multiple coats of alcohol-based lacquers, the way pianos were finished many years ago.  Our customers are welcome to choose any type of finish they prefer. Visit our daughter company, specializing in lacquers and buffed finish production: www.PianoFinish.com

 


Appraisals & Estimates

Amadeus Piano Co., Inc.

 

 

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Similar to wear-and-tear on automobiles, there are certain factors that affect the value of your piano.  These factors include the brand, age, location, service record, lighting, damage, use, etc.

   If you would like to purchase a piano or sell your piano, then only way to know the exact value of your instrument is to have a piano technician perform a full inspection and written appraisal on the instrument - this service can be ordered by clicking the link below.  Your will receive a written copy of the appraisal, as well as a full estimate for any repairs, restoration, or refinishing that are deemed necessary during inspection.  As always, the prices are extremely competitive and we will honor them at any time.

In NY and NJ call (800)33-TUNER in CT and Westchester (203)569-5078

  


Buying & Selling

Baby Grand Piano

 

 

 

 

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Are you looking to sell your piano - then list it with us!  Our listing service is $39.99 for a 3-month listing on our website.  We provide this listing service for our customers as an alternative to high-price consignment, where a piano dealer not only charges a percentage of the sale price as commission, but also maintenance and delivery fees after housing your piano - click here for more information.

Purchasing a piano privately can be an arduous task, and we can help!  Since a piano is usually a once-in-a-lifetime type of purchase, most people invite along a piano tuner or technician to see whether or not the piano is worth purchasing and what the necessary repair costs are, if any.  See Appraisals & Estimates above for more information.

See our own lineup of pianos for sale - simply click here to browse through new pianos, used pianos, even customers listing their own pianos.  We believe everyone should enjoy the privilege of owning a piano - so we offer flexible financing alternatives as low as $34.99/month* and rentals starting at $39.99/month*, call 1-800-338-8637 for details.

[* - pending credit approval // rates subject to change without notice // down payment may apply // call for details]

 

 


Rentals - Short/Long Term

Studio Upright Piano

 

 
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Short-Term Rentals:  whether you're renting a piano for a day, a week, or a month - we have a wide assortment of pianos available to meet your needs.  Unlike our competitors, when you call for a quote you get the final all-inclusive price including the instrument rental fee, round-trip moving fees, and on-site tuning - with no hidden charges.

   Long-Term Rentals:  need a piano for 6 months or more?  Save money with our long-term rental rates - you get discounted maintenance & moving and we throw in the first tuning for free!  And unlike owning a piano, you'll never have to pay for major repairs or restoration - we cover it!  And if the instrument ever approaches irreparable condition - we will provide for a replacement.

   With our "Rent w/Option to Buy" package, we will apply up to 6 months rental fees towards the purchase of the piano.  Now you can not only try before you buy, but save on expensive financing fees as well!

  


Moving - Local/Nationwide

Piano Moving

 

 

 

 

 

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We pride ourselves on the safe transportation and relocation of all acoustic pianos (antique, player pianos, or other keyboard instruments).  Our Local coverage area includes the entire North East / New England area - New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, Maryland, Delaware, D.C., Virginia, and West Virginia.  Our Long-Distance coverage area reaches far beyond just New England; we can now provide nationwide service from the West Coast to the East Coast, and anywhere in-between.

   Piano moving is a complicated and technical task which demands a great deal of human strength and dedication to the art of transporting the value, beauty and essence of a piano.  All acoustic pianos are made from different selections of wood, therefore each instrument is “one of a kind” and cannot be replaced if damaged - we appreciate and accept that responsibility.  We understand the invested and sentimental value of your piano and always treat it like our own.  A safe trip is assured, as your precious cargo is secured within one of our fleet’s vehicles.  Your piano will be carefully packaged and carried, with no detail spared.  We are properly scheduled and dedicate ourselves fully to every job, moving one piano at a time.

Click Here for a Free Quote on your Long-Distance Piano Move

Click Here for a Free Quote on your Local Piano Move (North East / New England)

 


Storage

Piano Storage and Restoration

 

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Our new state-of-the-art storage and restoration facility is now open for business!  Because of the larger space, we're now able to offer climate-controlled piano storage starting at $60.00 per month, plus the cost of delivery.  Since we provide the moving and storage, greater discounts for piano restoration and repairs are also available.  Within the same facility, your piano can be restored and wait for you in our climate-controlled storage rooms.  While in storage, piano tuning is also available - to keep up the string tension at all times. 

If you're having home repairs performed or you're relocating, don't take the risk of piano damage.  Let us store your upright or grand piano in our brand new climate-controlled storage and warehouse facility.

  


Lessons

Piano Lessons

 

 

 

 

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   Now, the same professional Tri-State coverage is available for music lessons as it is for quality piano service, and with the same quick availability and prompt scheduling.  Click on any item on the list below to find out more...

Our School Offers:
  1. Professional, fully accredited teachers
  2. New York, New Jersey, & Connecticut availability
  3. Immediate teacher replacement if student is unsatisfied
  4. Student Recitals
  5. In-Home, yet Competitive setting
  6. School Newsletter
  7. Reduced Piano Maintenance Costs
  8. Results, Results, Results!!!

Climate & Humidity Control Systems

Dampp-Chaser Piano Life Saver System

 

 

Protect your piano from humidity extremes with the proven Dampp-Chaser Piano Life Saver System.  More than a piece of fine furniture, your piano is a precision instrument.  Its more than 9,000 individual parts are uniquely susceptible to changes in humidity.  Yet very few homes are kept at the constant 42% humidity level necessary for the maintenance of optimum sound reproduction.  Instead, high humidity can cause the keys to stick and the strings to rust.  Central heating reduces moisture to unsafe levels, impairing wood quality and causing rattling keys, slipping pins and, eventually, a cracked soundboard.  Under these conditions, it is impossible for even the finest pianos to maintain tuning stability. Because the piano mechanism is enclosed in a cabinet, it can be protected by a simple internal system independent of external conditions.  Now, with the installation of an automatic humidity control system from Dampp-Chaser, you can keep your piano in a safe, stable environment, and save hundreds of dollars in repairs and maintenance in the years ahead and double its life.

 

 

How a Humidity Control System works:

(as illustrated on a grand piano)

   The Dampp-Chaser Grand Piano Humidity Control System installs neatly and out of sight on all grand pianos, even on the concert stage.  The 5-part Piano Life Saver® System is controlled by the Dampp-Chaser Humidistat which regulates both the Humidifier and Dehumidifier as each is needed to maintain the piano manufacturer's recommended relative humidity.  The maintenance-free dehumidifier installs under the soundboard, circulating warm air to eliminate excessive humidity.  The humidifier combines a 1-gallon water reservoir with a silent evaporative system that releases moisture inside the piano when the environment becomes too dry.  A low water warning light alerts you when it is time to refill tank.  An Easy Fill Watering Kit is included.


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